Chad Gadya embroidermation progress

embroidermation

A wee taste of the progress Theo and I are making on our “Chad Gadya” embroidermation project.

goat

Frames of the animation are stitched in groups of 6, arranged in a circle on matzo covers. We currently have 516 frames on 86 matzo covers, which I painstakingly finished by hand with multiple fabric layers and labels and everything.

Matzo covers

We hired Theo’s daughter, Emma, to help. Here she is ironing away while I adjust a lining.

NinaEmmaMatzoCovers

Here I am topstitching one of the 86 covers on a treadle sewing machine.

NinaHemsCover

We have a lot of additional photography, stitchcoding and stitching to do, but we are making progress. When the film is done the matzo covers will be for sale.

6 comments to Chad Gadya embroidermation progress

  • Michelle Klein-Hass

    I love the exuberance of the little goat! This is incredible! I’m in awe!

  • I’ve been in awe for some time now…just everything you do exhibits determination, craft and commitment. You are awesome Nina.

  • Amazing! As a computer scientist/fiber artist, I appreciate the way you employ many disciplines including machine embroidery, technology, coding, and math to create “embroidermation” — a new art form with a message. I’m interested in purchasing one of your matzo covers.

  • napari

    Im interested in learning a bit more.
    Are you located in Israel?
    What does the Hebrew lettering say or mean?
    How many differnet styles are you making?
    Im very interested in purchasing one if it is in the spirit of a Jewish Seder. Please forgive my ignorance if any.
    By all means do let me know the costs, including shipping to Clearwater, FL 33761 USA

  • napari

    If you could erase my last name in the comments Id appreciate it.

    Just keeping the nut jobs out of my life ty

  • salty-horse

    napari, the text says “PESACH” which is Passover in Hebrew.

    It’s debatable if the violence of Chad Gadya is in the “spirit” of the Seder (or the most representative part), but it’s certainly part of the Seder.

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>